eARC Book Review: Dream Me by Kathryn Berla

Dream Me

Goodreads Synopsis

Every night Babe dreams of a boy she s never met before named Zat. But Zat is no ordinary daydream. He s actual a human from the distant future, who has travelled back in time to be with Babe in the only way that he can be in her dreams. But the dreams leave Babe more and more tired and pained each morning. Zat is determined to help her, even if it means never sharing dreams with her again.


I received this book from the publisher on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Dream Me is a book that is a love story of sorts told through a science fiction point of view.

I’ll start right off by saying that most of this book was confusing to me. I don’t know what message was trying to be told and it irked me that I couldn’t tell because I felt like I was missing out on some joke.

Here’s what I did get. Zat was from a future Earth where the world and humans had evolved so much that even their appearance was changed. He was often referred to as a dreamer because even though people stopped dreaming ages ago, he was fascinated and obsessed with it, so much so that he was willing to live in and through someone else’s dreams.

As much as Babe spoke throughout the book, I didn’t much get the feel of her as a person. She was kind of the main character but I understood her through Zat’s eyes. The way he spoke about her and expressed his feelings about and towards her helped me know her better.

Even though this book threw me for a loop, I can’t deny that the author’s writing is amazing. Maybe there wasn’t much world building and certain points did seem either slightly forced or rushed but I wouldn’t write her off as yet.

Read: 2 April 2017
Rating: ★★.5

Publication Date: 11 July 2017
Publisher: Amberjack Publishing
Link to Author’s Goodreads Page: Kathryn Berla

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Book Review: The Time Keeper by Mitch Albom

13624688Goodreads Synopsis

In this fable, the first man on earth to count the hours becomes Father Time.

The inventor of the world’s first clock is punished for trying to measure God’s greatest gift. He is banished to a cave for centuries and forced to listen to the voices of all who come after him seeking more days, more years. Eventually, with his soul nearly broken, Father Time is granted his freedom, along with a magical hourglass and a mission: a chance to redeem himself by teaching two earthly people the true meaning of time.

He returns to our world – now dominated by the hour-counting he so innocently began – and commences a journey with two unlikely partners: one a teenage girl who is about to give up on life, the other a wealthy old businessman who wants to live forever. To save himself, he must save them both. And stop the world to do so.


Trigger Warnings: Underage drinking, suicide attempt.

I’d never read a book about Father Time before this so I was really looking forward to seeing how Mitch Albom executed the tale of the personification of time itself.

‘”There is a reason God limits our days.”
“Why?”
“To make each one precious.”‘

When I started the book, I thought that it’d be an easy one. I’d finish it quickly and then write out a review and all would be said and done. While the book wasn’t a difficult read or heavy on the heart, I had no idea how I was going to review it. The only thing I was absolutely certain of was that I was loving it.

Father Time, Dor as he was known before he became the inventor of the thing that weighs a lot of us down, is described to be an old man with a beard that’s so long it reaches his knees. I laughed at this description and thought that we’d found a man whose beard was longer than Dumbledore’s. Because Dor can’t resist counting; the moments, the cycles of the moon, breaths…he is ‘punished’ to live in a cave and listen to the consequences of wanting this power caused. How long? Till when Heaven meets Earth.

“Sitting high above the city, Father Time realized that knowing something and understanding it were not the same thing.”

In our current time we meet Sarah Lemon, a seventeen year old girl who doesn’t want more time, she just wants it to stop. And Victor Delemonte, an eighty-six year old man who wants nothing but time. He wants all the time he could possibly get. When Dor’s ‘sentence’ ends, he’s tasked with the job to find these two people and bring them together. He doesn’t know for what yet, but as the book goes on, the plan unfolds and it’s all pieced together.

I can’t really say what emotions I felt while reading this book. Opinions were formed sure, but those didn’t directly relate to what I was feeling at the moment. I had a lot of questions and a lot of them was me wanting to know why? One man wanted to live forever and one girl thought that one guy was the be all and end all of her entire existence.

“Ends are for yesterdays, not tomorrow.”

I really liked this book and thought it was really great. I don’t typically read books that talk about life, the universe, and everything but something about the synopsis drew me in and it was a spur of the moment buy for me. I’ve owned The First Phone Call From Heaven for a while now, but after reading this, I want to read that as soon as possible.

What I liked especially about this book was that to explain the situation, Father Time put things in perspective for Sarah and Victor and he didn’t make the choice for them. He showed them how they got here and what happened after they were gone. The rest was up to them.

I think that Mitch Albom wrote a very beautiful piece. This was inspiring, amazing, and everything in between.

‘”Time is not something you give back. The very next moment may be an answer to your prayer. To deny that is to deny the most important part of the future.”
“What’s that?”
“Hope.”‘

**Not apologising for all the quotes used. They were just too good to pass up.

Read: 22 May 2017
Rating: ★★★★

Publication Date: 1 May 2013
Publisher: Sphere
Link to Author’s Goodreads Page: Mitch Albom

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eARC Book Review: Extracted by R.R. Haywood

30837317Goodreads Synopsis

In 2061, a young scientist invents a time machine to fix a tragedy in his past. But his good intentions turn catastrophic when an early test reveals something unexpected: the end of the world.

A desperate plan is formed. Recruit three heroes, ordinary humans capable of extraordinary things, and change the future.

Safa Patel is an elite police officer, on duty when Downing Street comes under terrorist attack. As armed men storm through the breach, she dispatches them all.

‘Mad’ Harry Madden is a legend of the Second World War. Not only did he complete an impossible mission—to plant charges on a heavily defended submarine base—but he also escaped with his life.

Ben Ryder is just an insurance investigator. But as a young man he witnessed a gang assaulting a woman and her child. He went to their rescue, and killed all five.

Can these three heroes, extracted from their timelines at the point of death, save the world?


I received this book from the publisher on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Extracted tells the story of three people who were taken from their respective timelines at the point of their deaths-extracted- and are now looked to be the last hope at the world being saved. Very ‘Help me, Obi Wan Kenobi. You’re my only hope’-esque.

The synopsis for this book alone was well thought out. It doesn’t say much, but it gets you interested, which is precisely the point. As this is the first book in the trilogy, we don’t see how the mission turns out as a lot of world and character building takes place.

We don’t really get too deep into the time traveling because even though this is a time travel novel, it’s really not. The fact that people could travel through time was not what the main point of this story was. Sure, it was because of the invention of a time machine that started the unfortunate end of the world, but it was the saving of the world and how that’s going to be done that was more important in this book. I’m actually hoping that in books two and three we’ll get to travel a bit more…you know, when we’re sort of out of the immediate sight of danger.

When I first started this book I was so confused. I understood that each of the characters, Ben, Harry and Safa’s- extractions were being described in detail so that we as the readers could get a better understanding of how exactly that worked and I liked that part…it was the after that bothered me. Instead of the POV’s being separated by chapters, they were separated by paragraphs, it was more lines actually, and with no warning that the POV was changing. It was my only peeve about the book really. It would’ve probably have been more annoying though if we had to go through the same scenario three times with each character since all three of them were the main character.

Ben was a bit slow on the uptake and the one who I think got the worst end of the bargain. He was plucked out of his life and thrown into this new world where all of a sudden all these impossible things were now possible. He had no training for this and obviously didn’t know how to cope with all this unfamiliarity.

Harry was a hoot. This guy, the one who goes back the furthest seemed to almost blend in seemingly. Sure, he had his set way of doing things but he was a soldier. He was taught to obey. There’s no room for ‘no’.

I did not like Safa. I felt like even though it wasn’t intentional on her part, she was very…bossy. I don’t know how else to explain it. To me it was like that because she was the only female of this group she had to overcompensate and prove that she had the guts to do what they could, that she could be strong too. I’m glad that she was a powerful character in that sense but it got to the point where whatever she said went. By the time the words ‘Let him be a man. Give him his dignity.’ rolled around I was like thank the Heavens! Someone finally said it.

Overall, I thought this book was amazing! The writing was perfect and I didn’t want to stop reading. This story is still working it’s way through all the sections of my mind. I’m really interested in getting my hands on Executed-the second book- because I need to know what happens next we were kind of left with a cliffhanger. I’m glad I decided to request this book. No regrets at all.

Read: 7 February 2017
Rating:★★★★

Publication Date: 1 March 2017
Publisher: 47North
Link to Author’s Goodreads Page: R.R. Haywood

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eARC Book Review: The Girl From Everywhere by Heidi Heilig.


21979832Goodreads Synopsis

It was the kind of August day that hinted at monsoons, and the year was 1774, though not for very much longer.

Sixteen-year-old Nix Song is a time-traveller. She, her father and their crew of time refugees travel the world aboard The Temptation, a glorious pirate ship stuffed with treasures both typical and mythical. Old maps allow Nix and her father to navigate not just to distant lands, but distant times – although a map will only take you somewhere once. And Nix’s father is only interested in one time, and one place: Honolulu 1868. A time before Nix was born, and her mother was alive. Something that puts Nix’s existence rather dangerously in question…

Nix has grown used to her father’s obsession, but only because she’s convinced it can’t work. But then a map falls into her father’s lap that changes everything. And when Nix refuses to help, her father threatens to maroon Kashmir, her only friend (and perhaps, only love) in a time where Nix will never be able to find him. And if Nix has learned one thing, it’s that losing the person you love is a torment that no one can withstand. Nix must work out what she wants, who she is, and where she really belongs before time runs out on her forever.


 

I received this book from the publisher on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

The Girl From Everywhere is about Nix Song who doesn’t know any other home except The Temptation who her father, Slate, is the Captain of. Slate has a special gift of navigation that allows him to travel through time, given the right materials and belief. I say ‘belief’ because as it’s explained in the book, believing is very important in navigation.

I really liked the concept of the book and enjoyed where the author went with it. Slate’s obsession with finding a map that will lead him to 1868, put’s Nix in a difficult spot because she knows that’s the year where her mom was still alive.

The supporting characters in this book were a joy to experience. I liked Bee quite a lot. To me she had that motherly feel. Always looked out for the crew and Nix, since she is the youngest aboard.

I liked that they could travel from place to place, even those that are mythical. It’s almost as if ‘if you believe hard enough, it can come true’.

There were a few parts in this book that I felt could have been left out and I felt that at some places there was action when it was uncalled for and there was a stupid character here and there and made me shake my head.

Those dislikes could easily be ignored because the concept stayed the same and there wasn’t a derailing of the plot. The writing style was great and it’s always nice to read about a time-travelling pirate ship, because who doesn’t want that?

Read: 13 February 2016
Rating: ✮✮✮1/2

Publication Date: 16 February 2016
Publisher: Greenwillow Books
Link to Author’s Goodreads Page: Heidi Heilig