eARC Book Review: Dream Me by Kathryn Berla

Dream Me

Goodreads Synopsis

Every night Babe dreams of a boy she s never met before named Zat. But Zat is no ordinary daydream. He s actual a human from the distant future, who has travelled back in time to be with Babe in the only way that he can be in her dreams. But the dreams leave Babe more and more tired and pained each morning. Zat is determined to help her, even if it means never sharing dreams with her again.


I received this book from the publisher on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Dream Me is a book that is a love story of sorts told through a science fiction point of view.

I’ll start right off by saying that most of this book was confusing to me. I don’t know what message was trying to be told and it irked me that I couldn’t tell because I felt like I was missing out on some joke.

Here’s what I did get. Zat was from a future Earth where the world and humans had evolved so much that even their appearance was changed. He was often referred to as a dreamer because even though people stopped dreaming ages ago, he was fascinated and obsessed with it, so much so that he was willing to live in and through someone else’s dreams.

As much as Babe spoke throughout the book, I didn’t much get the feel of her as a person. She was kind of the main character but I understood her through Zat’s eyes. The way he spoke about her and expressed his feelings about and towards her helped me know her better.

Even though this book threw me for a loop, I can’t deny that the author’s writing is amazing. Maybe there wasn’t much world building and certain points did seem either slightly forced or rushed but I wouldn’t write her off as yet.

Read: 2 April 2017
Rating: ★★.5

Publication Date: 11 July 2017
Publisher: Amberjack Publishing
Link to Author’s Goodreads Page: Kathryn Berla

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Wrap Up: May 2017 (and June TBR)

SO delayed!!

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This Is What a Librarian Looks Like: A Celebration of Libraries, Communities, and Access to Information The Nightingale Circus (Broken People, #0.5) Supergirl: Rebirth #1 (Supergirl 2016, #1) Secret Wars #0 (FCBD 2015) Secret Wars (2015-) #1 (of 9) Then Comes Love (Then Comes Love, #1) The Giver (The Giver Quartet, #1) Time in a Bottle The Time Keeper City of Ashes (The Mortal Instruments, #2)

This is What a Librarian Looks Like by Kyle Cassidy

This book needs to be in all libraries. I deserves to be noticed and I think that this was easily one of the best reads for me this year. See review here.

The Nightingale Circus by Ioana Visan

I really enjoyed this novella, as I do with Ioana Visan’s work. I want to read Broken People so I can find out more about the circus and the people that use it as their safe haven. See review here.

Supergirl: Rebirth #1 by Steve Orlando

This was a different and fresh view of Supergirl for me. I enjoyed this short piece and I’m definitely considering reading more about her. See Review here.

Secret Wars #0 by Jonathan Hickman

It’s about time I started this event. I think everything was summed up pretty well in this piece. Review to come soon.

Secret Wars #1 by Jonathan Hickman

I thought this was a pretty good start to the whole event. Definitely got me even more intrigued. Review to come soon.

Then Comes Love by Lindsay Detwiler

A cute, funny, quick read. I really liked this book and enjoyed it tremendously. See review here.

The Giver by Lois Lowry

I’ve had this book for a few years and I took way to long to actually read it. I really liked it and I want to read the rest of The Giver Quartet. See review here.

Time in a Bottle by Kathleen D. Tresemer

I had a few issues with this book mainly because the proper trigger warnings weren’t applied but I really did enjoy the writing. See review here.

The Time Keeper by Mitch Albom

This was definitely one of the better books I’ve read this year. I can’t believe I took so long to get to it. See review here.

City of Ashes by Cassandra Clare

And so the reread continues! I loved this read a lot more the second time around and seeing my babies growing up is always a pleasure. See review here.

Total Read: 10 Books


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Revival, Vol. 3: A Faraway Place The Wicked + The Divine, Vol. 2: Fandemonium A Court of Wings and Ruin (A Court of Thorns and Roses, #3) Lord of Shadows (The Dark Artifices, #2)

ARCs (I swear this list is getting shorter)

Sleight Heartborn Loving Ashe: Book 1 of the Celebrity Series Soothsayer: Magic Is All Around Us (Soothsayer Series #1) Ever Shade (A Dark Faerie Tale, #1) Unseen (Breaking Free Book 1) Teeth: The First Bite (Teeth, #1) Jaeth's Eye (The Agartes Epilogues, #1) Demolition Love The Labyrinth Eve The Soul Reaper The Tower's Alchemist (The Gray Tower Trilogy, #1) Can't Buy Forever

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Book Review: City of Ashes by Cassandra Clare

City of Ashes (The Mortal Instruments, #2)Goodreads Synopsis

Clary Fray just wishes that her life would go back to normal. But what’s normal when you’re a demon-slaying Shadowhunter, your mother is in a magically induced coma, and you can suddenly see Downworlders like werewolves, vampires, and faeries? If Clary left the world of the Shadowhunters behind, it would mean more time with her best friend, Simon, who’s becoming more than a friend. But the Shadowhunting world isn’t ready to let her go — especially her handsome, infuriating, newfound brother, Jace. And Clary’s only chance to help her mother is to track down rogue Shadowhunter Valentine, who is probably insane, certainly evil — and also her father.

To complicate matters, someone in New York City is murdering Downworlder children. Is Valentine behind the killings — and if he is, what is he trying to do? When the second of the Mortal Instruments, the Soul-Sword, is stolen, the terrifying Inquisitor arrives to investigate and zooms right in on Jace. How can Clary stop Valentine if Jace is willing to betray everything he believes in to help their father?

In this breathtaking sequel to City of Bones, Cassandra Clare lures her readers back into the dark grip of New York City’s Downworld, where love is never safe and power becomes the deadliest temptation.


There may be spoilers for City of Bones ahead. You have been warned.

City of Ashes picks up almost immediately where City of Bones ended.  Clary has almost gotten used to the fact that she is a Shadowhunter, that’s she’s been thrust into the world of the supernatural and whether she likes it or not, the fight isn’t over yet. In fact, it’s barely begun. Valentine is still running around causing havock and now added to the mix, Downworlder children are being killed.

I read this book a few years ago and I think this was possibly my favourite in the series for a long time because back then I was a big supporter of Climon. Things are different now of course and I can’t even remember why I liked the two of them together so much.

In City of Ashes, Jocelyn, Clary’s mom, is still unconscious and no one knows how to wake her up. Clary is still trying to fight her feelings for Jace, whom as we know, was revealed to be her brother. Jace is being the arrogant a-hole, so that hasn’t changed. Sometimes I can’t help but wonder if Clary finding out the truth started a chain reaction.

I can only really talk about my feelings for this book because I feel like there’s too much that can be easily spoiled.

The first thing that I noticed was Isabelle’s character. I know her to be this BAMF, take no-nonsense woman, and in this book she is that but I forget that she’s roughly Clary’s age here. There’s so much about her that still screams ‘child’ and then I’m reminded that most of the characters in these books are still children. Looking back at this book and knowing how Isabelle ends up in the end…that’s beautiful character development. All the applause for that!

I’ve already mentioned in my City of Bones review that I could ignore Clary’s annoying characteristics because I was more focused on what else was going on. In this book, I didn’t find her that annoying. She asked a lot of questions yes, but that’s good because I feel that was a great way for us as readers to learn more about this world without there being endless paragraphs of unnecessary descriptions. She’s starting to grow as a character and I’m actually very excited to see that, since I’ll be paying more attention to that now.

In this book, we see a bit more of the Clave and what they stand for. Everything hasn’t been explained yet but there’s a bit of an outline. I don’t think we can take Valentine’s word on anything really but he doesn’t always lie.

Another thing I noticed: every time someone talks about how Jace is exactly like his father, it’s always about his character and personality and not about his looks, which I think is great foreshadowing for what’s about to happen.

One thing I do like about Clary though, she wasn’t raised a Shadowhunter, so she doesn’t think like one. Sometimes her ideas and questions are so innocent you can’t help but go: oh honey. But then you see what her questions and ideas are doing and you can’t help but smile. She helped Alec, she’s helping Jace. She knocked some sense into Luke. Sometimes the means she goes about achieving this are sketchy but I think she’s one of the best things to happen to this book world. That might be overstepping it a bit but changes started happening once Clary came along, and I’m not ashamed of my opinion.

Have I spoken about how much I hate Valentine yet? I probably have but I hate that guy. Valentine’s issue is that he really believes in what he’s doing and that’s the problem. He believes that the world he desires is the world that was supposed to be there from the beginning and he’ll break heaven and hell to achieve this. There’s something he said in this book: “But isn’t that what love is, Clarissa? Ownership? ‘I am my beloved’s and my beloved is mine,’ as the Song of Songs goes.”

He’s so far removed from humanity and its emotions, sometimes I wonder if he’s even human. His ideals are not ‘normal’ and he seeks destruction claiming that it’s enlightenment. I don’t think I’ll ever really understand him and his is not a head I want to get into.

I don’t remember too much from my first time reading this book but I do know that I loved this second read so much more. New characters were introduced, knowledge was expanded and even though it’s still small, the story’s starting to evolve.

I like the action that Cassie Clare puts in each book. It’s like: if that wasn’t the final battle, what will the actual battle look like? She spares no detail and every climax is as big as the previous, if not bigger.

I don’t mind taking so long to finish these books because it gives me time to reflect and process everything. I’d even go as far as to say that it felt like I was reading this book for the first time and I’m so happy about that.

I know that there’s a lot that awaits us in City of Glass and my bags for this feels trip are already packed.

Read: 25 May 2017
Rating: ★★★★★

Publication Date: 7 July 2008
Publisher: Walker Childrens Paperbacks
Link to Author’s Goodreads Page: Cassandra Clare

  • My review for City of Bones here.
  • My reviews for other books in the Shadowhunter Chronicles here.

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eARC Book Review: Time in a Bottle by Kathleen D. Tresemer 

Time in a Bottle

Goodreads Synopsis

Beth Frye wants what we all want: to be accepted, maybe even cool. But high school’s tough for a music geek.
Things start looking up when she discovers vodka. It gives her cool friends, a gorgeous guy, and the chance to perform in NYC: all her dreams are coming true.
But, as her drinking addiction gets worse, things get complicated. She ends up in the hospital, someone is stalking her, twin brother Teddy’s trying to fix her, and that cop keeps hanging around.
Get some help? No thanks. Beth just wants what she wants, when she wants it!
The book includes helpful resources and discussion questions.


I received this book from the publisher on NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

Trigger Warnings: Underage drinking, Assault, Rape, Being drugged, Underage Sex, Rehabilitation, Relapses, Near-death experiences, Attempted murder.

**When a book is not categorised as Fantasy that automatically includes the more dangerous and scary stuff…all Trigger Warnings apply.

When I requested this book, I had no idea that it was going to be focused on such heavy topics. Apart from the alcoholism…but that was in the synopsis. I feel like this book was so much more than what we were promised and that it encompassed everything. Nothing was sugar-coated.

Beth and Teddy are twins, brother and sister, and they have a system that they work with. Beth needs help and Teddy’s there, rushing in, ready to save the day. This works, until it doesn’t anymore. Beth enters this spiral that leads her further down a hole and she can’t pull herself back out mainly because she doesn’t realise how deep in she’s fallen.

I’ll admit that at the beginning, I didn’t like Beth. There was no love lost there and I wondered if I should even feel sorry for her. Her attitude was not something that I was a fan of. She was extremely rude and bitchy and didn’t regarded anyone’s feelings in any way, shape or form. She barely cared about herself. This story was told from two sides, Beth and Teddy’s. I liked that we saw how she thought nothing was wrong, and then through Teddy’s eyes, you saw how things were slowly falling apart.

I feel that this book greatly showcased what substance abusers do to their loved ones. Maybe it’s not on purpose, but who’s behind them? Either trying to help or unknowingly making things worse. Something I read a while ago talked about funerals and about how they’re not for the person who died, they’re for the family and people they left behind. To help them cope. To give them some sense of peace. I think it’s similar for the people in this book. What they do, or what happens to them, doesn’t just affect them only.

I was shocked the further I got into this book because as I said, I wasn’t expecting it to be so heavy. Would I have still read it knowing what it entailed? Honestly I don’t know. This is why Trigger Warnings are important. I think they would’ve played a part in my choice.

I’ve had this book sitting in my Kindle App for months and I was reluctant to read it. I forgot why I had requested it and I didn’t see the sense in reading it. I do think that the stuff mentioned in this book is very important and it could help a lot of people out there, so there is a silver lining to all this. Sort of.

I do like the way the author went about this book. Nothing seemed too forced and everything was done in stages. I liked that the book was separated in parts by why of months. It helped with keeping track of the time frame. At the start of each part, the author included a quote that related well to what was going on in the story at the time.

I try to stay away from books like this only because I never know how to feel when I’m done with them. I have to admit that realistic stories of this kind are way too scary for me to frequent.

I did really like the book though. My lower rating is because of the lack of overall warning of what this book contained and the fact that the book was on the shorter side but had chapters that were 2 pages long. That’s a bit of a peeve for me so I wasn’t a fan. Really great style from the author and I think she covered just about everything.

Read: 18 May 2017
Rating: ★★★.5

Publication Date: 19 June 2016
Publisher: Soul Fire PRess
Link to Author’s Goodreads Page: Kathleen D. Tresemer

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Book Review: The Giver by Lois Lowry

The Giver (The Giver Quartet, #1)Goodreads Synopsis

“I have great honor,” The Giver said. “So will you. But you will find that is not the same as power.”

Life in the community where Jonas lives is idyllic. Designated birthmothers produce newchildren, who are assigned to appropriate family units: one male, one female, to each. Citizens are assigned their partners and their jobs. No one thinks to ask questions. Everyone obeys. The community is a world without conflict, inequality, divorce, unemployment injustice…or choice.

Everyone is the same.

Except Jonas.

At the Ceremony of Twelve, the community’s twelve-year-olds eagerly accept their predetermined Life Assignments. But Jonas is chosen for something special. He begins instruction in his life’s work with a mysterious old man known only as The Giver. Gradually Jonas learns that power lies in feelings. But when his own power is put to the test—when he must try to save someone he loves—he may not be ready. Is it too soon? Or too late?


In The Giver, things such as inequality, conflict…choice in general are foreign concepts. Everything and everyone are assigned to what and who they’d be best suited with. No one argues with this because that would ruin the image of perfection.

After I finished this book I had to take a few days to gather my thoughts because I honestly had no idea how I felt about the story as a whole. Lois Lowry wrote what is in my opinion a great book. The idea of the plot is just so…out there. Like, imagine a perfect world. Imagine if people could achieve this perfect world, where being ‘different’ isn’t a thing. Everyone looks the same, acts the same, and there’s no room for judgement, rudeness or conflict.

I didn’t read the synopsis, which is not unusual for me so I went in not knowing anything really. The idea did occur to me that yes, a world where there’s no hate, no war…no hunger, would be perfect and amazing. I found myself wishing for just that but then I stopped to think: at what cost would all of this be possible? And that right there is the punchline to the joke that in actual fact is not a joke at all.

This book is categorised as ‘Middle Grade’ and I personally believe that that’s only because of how old the main character, Jonas, is. He’s eleven when all this starts so he’s starting to see the world in a new light. Asking more questions that in this community, one is not supposed to ask. There’s nothing middle grade about this book though. I found this to be horrific but not in a scary close-your-eyes way, more like…when the image is put in your mind, and you think of what goes on behind the scenes, it’s frightening. I think this is where the term ‘ignorance is bliss’ comes in. These people don’t know what they’re missing, so it’s not a problem for them.

I did like that this was told from a child’s point of view. Jonas has this innocence about him. He starts out as a curious kid and in the end, he’s fighting for his life. All because of him knowing the truth. Not many people like change, but I think this was taking it to a new level.

Heaven alone knows why I took so long to get to this book because I thought it was amazing. Once I had a free moment, I finished it and I couldn’t decide where I stood with everything. I’m still in a state of- I want to say confusion.

Lois Lowry did an excellent job with this book. I greatly enjoyed her writing style and look forward to continuing The Giver Quartet.

Read: 13 May 2017
Rating: ★★★★

Publication Date: 1 July 2014
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Link to Author’s Goodreads Page: Lois Lowry

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Book Review: Godshaper #1 by Simon Spurrier

Godshaper #1Goodreads Synopsis

Written by Eisner Award-nominated writer Simon Spurrier (The Spire, X-Men Legacy) and illustrated by breakout talent Jonas Goonface, Godshaper introduces a vast world where there’s a god for every person and a person for every god…though for Ennay, unfortunately exceptions may apply. People like him are Godshapers, godless social pariahs with the ability to mold and shape the gods of others. Paired with Bud, an off-kilter but affectionate god without a human, the two travel from town to town looking for shelter, a hot meal, and the next paying rock ‘n’ roll gig


This comic tells us a story where the world is so much different than we know but at the same time I feel like it could just as easily relate to the world we’re currently living in.

In this comic there is a god for every person and a person for every god. Of course you get the exceptions and those few who are raised without a god are called ‘godshapers’.

We follow musician Ennay- a godshaper- and Bud- a god without a human. Together they go from town to town standing out while also trying to fit in. Even though shapers were raised without gods and belief, they were given a fit: they can mold and shape godflesh. While Ennay uses this ability to keep customers busy, Bud scavenges for food and useful items nearby.

“You know what it is to be a shaper–really? Everyone needs ya, nobody wants ya.”

I like the idea of this comic and it seems like it’s going to go far. The writing was awesome and fast-paced and the artwork was amazing!

I can’t wait to continue this comic. I’m definitely intrigued and have high hopes for the continuation.

Read: 18 April 2017
Rating: ★★★★

Publication Date: 12 April 2017
Publisher: BOOM! Studios
Writer: Simon Spurrier
Illustrator: Jonas Goonface

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Expected Releases for May 2017

May seems to be the month of book releases.

Goodreads synopsis included.

2 May

The Dark Prophecy (The Trials of Apollo, #2)

The Dark Prophecy (The Trials of Apollo, #2) by Rick Riordan

Zeus has punished his son Apollo—god of the sun, music, archery, poetry, and more—by casting him down to earth in the form of a gawky, acne-covered sixteen-year-old mortal named Lester. The only way Apollo can reclaim his rightful place on Mount Olympus is by restoring several Oracles that have gone dark. What is affecting the Oracles, and how can Apollo do anything about them without his powers? After experiencing a series of dangerous—and frankly, humiliating—trials at Camp Half-Blood, Apollo must now leave the relative safety of the demigod training ground and embark on a hair-raising journey across North America. Fortunately, what he lacks in godly graces he’s gaining in new friendships—with heroes who will be very familiar to fans of the Percy Jackson and the Olympians and Heroes of Olympus series. Come along for what promises to be a harrowing, hilarious, and haiku-filled ride. . . .

Amazon | Goodreads


From Percy Jackson: Camp Half-Blood Confidential (An Official Rick Riordan Companion Book): Your Real Guide to the Demigod Training Camp From Percy Jackson: Camp Half-Blood Confidential (An Official Rick Riordan Companion Book): Your Real Guide to the Demigod Training Camp by Rick Riordan

In response to an awful camp orientation video created by the god Apollo, Percy Jackson and other residents of Camp Half-Blood answer such questions as “What is this place?” and “Do I get to keep the T-shirt?” Newbies can check out the section on the Divine Cabins, read up on Magical Landmarks, and consult the chapter of Training Arenas. But Camp Half-Blood Confidential explores much more than just the buildings and grounds. It includes info that can only be learned from those who live there.

For instance, campers do not always co-exist in peace and harmony. The camp is not run with superior efficiency. Prophecies do not flow forth with great regularity. Sprinkled throughout are stories from heroes who have called Camp Half-Blood home or just passed through on their way to places unknown. Chiron himself introduces the book with a brief history of training based on his millennia of experience. And, of course, there are divine words of wisdom from the god Apollo himself, because . . . well, because the demigod authors would prefer not to be struck down, thank you very much.

Amazon | Goodreads


A Court of Wings and Ruin (A Court of Thorns and Roses, #3)A Court of Wings and Ruin (A Court of Thorns and Roses, #3) by Sarah J. Maas

Looming war threatens all Feyre holds dear in the third volume of the #1 New York Times bestselling A Court of Thorns and Roses series.

Feyre has returned to the Spring Court, determined to gather information on Tamlin’s maneuverings and the invading king threatening to bring Prythian to its knees. But to do so she must play a deadly game of deceit-and one slip may spell doom not only for Feyre, but for her world as well.

As war bears down upon them all, Feyre must decide who to trust amongst the dazzling and lethal High Lords-and hunt for allies in unexpected places.

In this thrilling third book in the #1 New York Times bestselling series from Sarah J. Maas, the earth will be painted red as mighty armies grapple for power over the one thing that could destroy them all.

Amazon | Goodreads


Always and Forever, Lara Jean (To All the Boys I've Loved Before, #3)Always and Forever, Lara Jean (To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, #3) by Jenny Han

Lara Jean’s letter-writing days aren’t over in this surprise follow-up to the New York Times bestselling To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before and P.S. I Still Love You.

Lara Jean is having the best senior year a girl could ever hope for. She is head over heels in love with her boyfriend, Peter; her dad’s finally getting remarried to their next door neighbor, Ms. Rothschild; and Margot’s coming home for the summer just in time for the wedding.

But change is looming on the horizon. And while Lara Jean is having fun and keeping busy helping plan her father’s wedding, she can’t ignore the big life decisions she has to make. Most pressingly, where she wants to go to college and what that means for her relationship with Peter. She watched her sister Margot go through these growing pains. Now Lara Jean’s the one who’ll be graduating high school and leaving for college and leaving her family—and possibly the boy she loves—behind.

When your heart and your head are saying two different things, which one should you listen to?

Amazon | Goodreads


Saga: Book TwoSaga Book Two by Brian K. Vaughn

At long last, it’s finally time for the second hardcover collection of Saga, the New York Times best-selling series praised by everyone from Alan Moore to Lin-Manuel Miranda!

Created by the multiple Eisner Award-winning team of artist Fiona Staples (Mystery Society, North 40, Archie Comics) and writer Brian K. Vaughan (The Private Eye, Paper Girls, We Stand On Guard), Saga Book Two continues the action-packed education of Hazel, a child born to star-crossed parents from opposite sides of a never-ending galactic war.

Collecting 18 issues of the smash-hit comic, this massive edition features a striking original cover from Fiona Staples, as well as a brand-new gallery of exclusive, never-before-seen Saga artwork from legendary creators including Cliff Chiang, Pia Guerra, Faith Erin Hicks, Karl Kerschl, Jason Latour, Sean Gordon Murphy, Steve Skroce, and more!

Collects SAGA #19-36.

Amazon | Goodreads


Star Wars: Rebel RisingStar Wars: Rebel Rising by Beth Revis

When Jyn Erso was five years old, her mother was murdered and her father taken from her to serve the Empire. But despite the loss of her parents she is not completely alone—Saw Gerrera, a man willing to go to any extremes necessary in order to resist Imperial tyranny, takes her in as his own, and gives her not only a home but all the abilities and resources she needs to become a rebel herself.

Jyn dedicates herself to the cause—and the man. But fighting alongside Saw and his people brings with it danger and the question of just how far Jyn is willing to go as one of Saw’s soldiers. When she faces an unthinkable betrayal that shatters her world, Jyn will have to pull the pieces of herself back together and figure out what she truly believes in…and who she can really trust.

Amazon | Goodreads


Into the WaterInto the Water by Paula Hawkins

The author of the #1 New York Times bestseller and global phenomenon The Girl on the Train returns with Into the Water, her addictive new novel of psychological suspense.

A single mother turns up dead at the bottom of the river that runs through town. Earlier in the summer, a vulnerable teenage girl met the same fate. They are not the first women lost to these dark waters, but their deaths disturb the river and its history, dredging up secrets long submerged.

Left behind is a lonely fifteen-year-old girl. Parentless and friendless, she now finds herself in the care of her mother’s sister, a fearful stranger who has been dragged back to the place she deliberately ran from—a place to which she vowed she’d never return.

With the same propulsive writing and acute understanding of human instincts that captivated millions of readers around the world in her explosive debut thriller, The Girl on the Train, Paula Hawkins delivers an urgent, twisting, deeply satisfying read that hinges on the deceptiveness of emotion and memory, as well as the devastating ways that the past can reach a long arm into the present.

Beware a calm surface—you never know what lies beneath.

Amazon | Goodreads

***

9 May

Men Without Women

Men Without Women by Haruki Murakami

A dazzling new collection of short stories–the first major new work of fiction from the beloved, internationally acclaimed, Haruki Murakami since his #1 best-selling Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage.

Across seven tales, Haruki Murakami brings his powers of observation to bear on the lives of men who, in their own ways, find themselves alone. Here are vanishing cats and smoky bars, lonely hearts and mysterious women, baseball and the Beatles, woven together to tell stories that speak to us all.

Marked by the same wry humor that has defined his entire body of work, in this collection Murakami has crafted another contemporary classic.

Amazon | Goodreads

***

23 May

Lord of Shadows (The Dark Artifices, #2)

Lord of Shadows (The Dark Artifices, #2) by Cassandra Clare

Sunny Los Angeles can be a dark place indeed in Cassandra Clare’s Lord of Shadows, the sequel to the #1 New York Times and USA TODAY bestselling Lady Midnight.

Emma Carstairs has finally avenged her parents. She thought she’d be at peace. But she is anything but calm. Torn between her desire for her parabatai Julian and her desire to protect him from the brutal consequences of parabatai relationships, she has begun dating his brother, Mark. But Mark has spent the past five years trapped in Faerie; can he ever truly be a Shadowhunter again?

And the faerie courts are not silent. The Unseelie King is tired of the Cold Peace, and will no longer concede to the Shadowhunters’ demands. Caught between the demands of faerie and the laws of the Clave, Emma, Julian, and Mark must find a way to come together to defend everything they hold dear—before it’s too late.

Amazon | Goodreads

***

30 May

One of Us Is Lying

One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus

One of Us Is Lying is the story of what happens when five strangers walk into detention and only four walk out alive. Everyone is a suspect, and everyone has something to hide.
 
Pay close attention and you might solve this.
On Monday afternoon, five students at Bayview High walk into detention.
    Bronwyn, the brain, is Yale-bound and never breaks a rule.
    Addy, the beauty, is the picture-perfect homecoming princess.
    Nate, the criminal, is already on probation for dealing.
    Cooper, the athlete, is the all-star baseball pitcher.
    And Simon, the outcast, is the creator of Bayview High’s notorious gossip app.
 
Only, Simon never makes it out of that classroom. Before the end of detention Simon’s dead. And according to investigators, his death wasn’t an accident. On Monday, he died. But on Tuesday, he’d planned to post juicy reveals about all four of his high-profile classmates, which makes all four of them suspects in his murder. Or are they the perfect patsies for a killer who’s still on the loose?
 
Everyone has secrets, right? What really matters is how far you would go to protect them.

Amazon | Goodreads

Goodreads Listopia for upcoming May 2017 releases:

 

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